/ Games / Windows 10 doesn’t run games with Securom and SafeDisc DRM

Windows 10 doesn’t run games with Securom and SafeDisc DRM

Andrea on August 28, 2015 - 1:33 pm in Games

 

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You can play all kinds of games on your Windows 10 PC — including Xbox One titles, thanks to its built-in streaming support. There are two kinds of games you can’t play, however: games that are “infected” with Securom or SafeDisc DRM.

Windows 10 simply doesn’t support either DRM scheme. Why? It has to do with various security upgrades Microsoft made to Windows 10. It’s not possible for software to dig its claws deep down into certain critical system areas any more. That’s a good thing, because it should make it harder for malware to compromise a Windows 10 machine. Most legit software that runs on older OSes like Windows 7 isn’t affected, but two types are: antivirus apps and invasive DRM.

Newer versions of your antivirus software of choice (assuming you have one and you’re not just letting Windows Defender patrol your desktop) will run fine on Windows 10. Some of the games in your library, however, might not.

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Of course, there’s a good chance that they didn’t run fine when they were released anyway. Securom and SafeDisc are two of the most hated technologies gamers have ever encountered, not least because they were riddled with deficiencies that prevented games (and even other unrelated Windows software like Process Explorer) from loading. EA was slapped with a $5 million class action lawsuit over their use of SecuRom in Spore back in 2008. Its inclusion also led to widespread piracy of the game, yet EA continued using it.

Just last year, they reminded everyone how awful SecuRom is when they decided to give away The Sims 2: Ultimate Collection. Fortunately, tutorials on how to remove DRM from games spread like wildfire… and they just might be all you need to get your games running on Windows 10. There’s probably a patch out there for anything you’re jonesing to play.

And don’t worry: Microsoft won’t remotely disable your patched games if it makes them look like counterfeits, despite what you may have read lately. All that fuss about their EULA giving them a kill switch got stirred up because bloggers didn’t realize that particular EULA applied to services like Xbox Games and not Windows itself.

Source: Apps – Geek.com

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